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06/08/2017

Get to Know Your Legislators!

This Month: Senator Goeff Hansen (R-Hart)

In an effort to help Michigan chiropractors remain involved in the political process, the Journal periodically profiles a prominent legislator in our pages. There are a number of changes in the 99th Legislature, including one new member of the Michigan Senate, 42 new members in the Michigan House, and new leadership in the House Republican and Democratic caucuses. This month, we profile a member of the Michigan Senate Appropriations Committee, State Senator Goeff Hansen of Hart.

Geoff Hansen PhotoIn an effort to help Michigan chiropractors remain involved in the political process, the Journal periodically profiles a prominent legislator in our pages. There are a number of changes in the 99th Legislature, including one new member of the Michigan Senate, 42 new members in the Michigan House, and new leadership in the House Republican and Democratic caucuses. This month, we profile a member of the Michigan Senate Appropriations Committee, state Senator Goeff Hansen of Hart. 

Earlier this year, state Senators Mike Nofs (R-Battle Creek) and Tony Stamas (R-Midland) introduced Senate Bills 282 and 283, legislation that would require Auto No-Fault and Workers’ Comp insurers to pay for all chiropractic services lawfully delivered under Michigan’s chiropractic scope of practice. One Michigan senator who immediately got behind the bills was state Senator Goeff Hansen (R-Hart) (pictured), who co-sponsored both bills. 

Senator Hansen is a member of the Senate appropriations Committee. In the Michigan Legislature, the Senate and House Appropriations Committees are perhaps the most important and powerful committees, as they deal with the state’s $50 billion+ annual budget. Senator Hansen chairs the Committee’s K-12, School Aid, and Education Subcommittee and the Transportation Subcommittee. He also serves on the Capital Outlay Subcommittee. 

Apart from his duties on the Appropriations Committee, Senator Hansen serves as Chair of the Government Operations and Outdoor Recreation and Tourism committees, and as a member of the Michigan Capitol Committee. He was also elected by his peers in the Senate Republican Caucus to serve as Assistant Majority Leader, one of the most powerful positions in Senate leadership. 

Prior to his tenure in the Senate, Senator Hansen served three terms in the Michigan House of Representatives, from 2005 to 2010. Prior to that, he served as Hart Township Supervisor for four years. He was co-owner and partner of Hansen Foods in Hart, and his community involvement includes 20 years as a first responder, EMT and firefighter – as well as numerous local government, civic and education-related positions. 

Sen. Hansen has received numerous honors for his work in the Legislature, including Legislator of the Year awards from the Michigan Council of Maternal & Child Health, Muskegon Breastfeeding Coalition, Michigan Primary Care Association, Michigan Lodging & Tourism Association, Michigan Library Association, Michigan Community Action Agency Association and Michigan Food and Farming Systems. He has also won the Agricultural Advocate Award from the Michigan Agribusiness Association. As the Senate’s lead sponsor and negotiator of the Detroit Public Schools education reform package, the Detroit Branch of the NAACP recognized his efforts with the 2016 Mary Church Terrell Freedom & Justice Award. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Michigan Center for Rural Health. 

He is a member of the Michigan Farm Bureau, NRA, MCRGO, Ruffed Grouse Society, Whitetails Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited, and Pheasants Forever. Sen. Hansen and his wife, Tamara, live in Hart and have two grown sons and four grandchildren. 

State Senator Goeff Hansen was first elected in November 2010 to serve the constituents of the 34th Senate District, which includes the counties of Muskegon, Newaygo, and Oceana. Currently serving his second term in the Michigan Senate, he is ineligible to serve any additional terms under Michigan’s term limits law.

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